Population information

Order name Charadriiformes
Family name Scolopacidae
Scientific name Calidris acuminata Common name Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Population name C & E Siberia (bre)
Breeding range NC & NE Siberia Lena Delta - Kolyma River Non-breeding range Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, China
Red List Category Least Concern
Ramsar regions Asia North America Oceania
Notes

Conservation Framework

Conservation framework Notes
EAAF Partnership
Note:

Population size

Publication Start year End year Minimum Maximum Estimate quality Notes References Actions
WPE 1 0 0 166,000 166,000 [R689]
WPE 2 0 0 -1 -1
WPE 3 0 0 160,000 160,000 [R35]
WPE 4 0 0 160,000 160,000 [S1185] [R36]
WPE 5 2007 2007 160,000 160,000 Census based [S6736] [R36]

Population trends

Publication Start year End year Trend Trend quality Notes References Actions
WPE 1 0 0 Unknown
WPE 2 0 0 Unknown
WPE 3 0 0 Unknown
WPE 4 0 0 Unknown
WPE 5 0 0 Unknown No idea

Population 1% level

Publication Yearset 1 percent Note
WPE 1 1994 1700
WPE 2 0 -1
WPE 3 2002 1600
WPE 4 2006 1600
WPE 5 2012 1600

References

  • R689 - Watkins, D. 1993. A National Plan for Shorebird Conservation in Australia. Report to World Wide Fund for Nature. Prepared by the Australasian Wader Studies Group.
  • R35 - Bamford, M.J., Watkins, D.G., Bancroft, W. Tischler, G and Wahl, J. (2008). Migratory Shorebirds of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway; Population Estimates and Important Sites. Wetlands International - Oceania.
  • R36 - Bamford, M.J., Watkins, D.G., Bancroft, W. Tischler, G and Wahl, J. (in prep, 2006). Migratory Shorebirds of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway; Population Estimates and Important Sites. Wetlands International - Oceania.

Notes

  • S1185 - 479: 3,000 estimated to occur on passage on Pacific coast of North America, of which 1,000 in Canada.
  • S6736 - Estimate retained from WPE4; insufficient new information for a reassessment. Ongoing comprehensive analysis by University of Queensland is anticipated to shortly provide a reassessment. In Australia, some declines recorded at coastal sites but difficult to interpret because large proportion of population seems to preferentially use vast inland wetlands when habitat is suitable, such as after major floods or in wetter periods of years, which occur erratically.



Copyright Wetlands International 2012

Citation: Wetlands International (). "Waterbird Population Estimates" . Retrieved from wpe.wetlands.org on