Population information

Order name Charadriiformes
Family name Charadriidae
Scientific name Vanellus vanellus Common name Northern Lapwing
Population name Europe, W Asia/Europe, N Africa & SW Asia
Breeding range Europe & W Asia Non-breeding range Europe, Asia Minor, North Africa, SW & Central Asia, Caspian
Red List Category Near Threatened
Ramsar regions Africa Asia Europe
Notes Europe/Europe & North Africa and Western Asia/South-west Asia populations merged to Europe, W Asia/Europe, N Africa & SW Asia in WPE5, following proposal in CSR5. Review published in 2009 Wader Atlas suggests mixing of populations in all seasons to an extent that makes separation invalid.

Conservation Framework

Conservation framework Notes
AEWA
CAF Action Plan
EUBD
Note:

Population size

Publication Start year End year Minimum Maximum Estimate quality Notes References Actions
WPE 5 2005 2005 5,500,000 9,500,000 Best guess [R624]
CSR 6 1990 2012 5,500,000 9,500,000 Best guess [S8578] [R1362] [R1361] [R63] [R1365] [R1371]

Population trends

Publication Start year End year Trend Trend quality Notes References Actions
WPE 5 1995 2010 STA Poor [T4927] [R859]
CSR 6 2003 2012 DEC Reasonable [T6571] [R1381] [R1362] [R1361]

Population 1% level

Publication Yearset 1 percent Note
WPE 5 2012 72300
CSR 6 0 -1

References

  • R624 - Thorup, O. (comp) 2006. Breeding Waders in Europe 2000. International Wader Studies 14. International Wader Study Group, UK.
  • R859 - EBCC PECBMS data accessed March 2011: http://www.ebcc.info/index.php?ID=387
  • R1362 - European Topic Centre on Biological Diversity (in prep) Population and trend data provided by the EU Member States in the frame of their reporting under Article 12 of the EU Birds Directive. Online fact sheets. European Topic Centre on Biological Diversity, Paris. URL: http://bd.eionet.europa.eu/activities/Reporting/Article_12/Reports_2013/Member_State_Deliveries. Accessed on 31 July 2014.
  • R1361 - BirdLife International, BTO, EBCC, CSO, IUCN, RSPB, SOVON, Wetlands International (in prep) Population and trend data provided to the European Red List of Birds Project funded by the European Commission. Digital dataset. BirdLife International, Cambridge, UK. Accessed on 31 July 2014.
  • R63 - BirdLife International (2004)b. Birds in Europe, population estimates, trends and conservation status. Cambridge, UK: BirdLife International. (BirdLife Conservation Series No. 12).
  • R1365 - Wetlands International, International Waterbird Census, unpublished data, 2014.
  • R1371 - Dodman, T. 2014. Status, Estimates and Trends of Waterbird Populations in Africa: AEWA-listed African populations. Wetlands International. (CSR6 African populations) URL: https://www.wetlands.org/publications/1304/
  • R1381 - Nagy, S., Flink, S., Langendoen, T. (2014) Waterbird trends 1988-2012: Results of trend analyses of data from the International Waterbird Census in the African-Eurasian Flyway. Wetlands International, Ede.
  • R1549 - BirdLife International 2015. European Red List of Birds. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities. http://datazone.birdlife.org/info/euroredlist
  • R1548 - Wetlands International (2017) Flyway trend analyses based on data from the African-Eurasian Waterbird Census from the period of 1967-2015. Ede, The Netherlands: Wetlands International. Temporary URL: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/r76f4eyuhzu65co/AADzzQkhySsUDsmwFJUcHs91a?dl=0

Notes

  • T4927 - Delany et al. 2009: Population decreased 1980-1995, stable 1995-2010. In CSR5, Trend 1986-2007: +3.5% p.a. ? Increase. However, effects of shifting winter distribution and changing habitat use are possible causes of discrepant trends.
  • S8578 - 1,529,587-2,466,025 pairs in Europe (European Topic Centre on Biological Diversity, in prep., BirdLife International et al., in prep.) with the exception of AL, AM, AZ, HR, CZ, FO, LI, MK, MD, UA and RS&ME where further 79,270-148,026 pairs can be assumed based on data from 1990-20000 (BirdLife International, 2004). According to Dodman (2014), c. 100 pairs in Morocco. These together yield an estimate of 4,800,000-7,850,000 individuals, which is slightly lower than theestimate based on BirdLife International (2004). In SW Asia, up to 90,465 birds (2003) were counted during IWC counts and part of the birds winter to the west of the region (Wetlands International, 2014). However, there is no sufficient new information to improve of the current estimate.
  • T6571 - Nagy et al. (2014) shows significant long-term decline. This agrees well with the trend derived from national breeding bird population estimates (European Topic Centre on Biological Diversity, in prep., BirdLife International et al., in prep.), which were 0.9730-0.9968 for the short-term (2000-2012) and 0.9864-0.9961 for the long-term (1980-2012).
  • S8935 - 1,593,849-2,584,810 pairs in Europe (BirdLife International, 2015). According to Dodman (2014), c. 100 pairs in Morocco. In SW Asia, up to 90,465 birds (2003) were counted during IWC counts and part of the birds winter to the west of the region (Wetlands International, 2014). However, there is no sufficient new information to improve of the current estimate.
  • T6988 - IWC data shows moderate short-term decline that followed strong increase to the mid-1990s (Wetlands International 2017). BirdLife International (2015) shows strong decline in breeding numbers both in the long-and short-term.



Copyright Wetlands International 2012

Citation: Wetlands International (). "Waterbird Population Estimates" . Retrieved from wpe.wetlands.org on