Population information

Order name Anseriformes
Family name Anatidae
Scientific name Aythya nyroca Common name Ferruginous Duck
Population name Western Asia/SW Asia & NE Africa
Breeding range W & SW Asia Non-breeding range SW Asia & NE Africa
Red List Category Near Threatened
Ramsar regions Africa Asia Europe
Notes

Conservation Framework

Conservation framework Notes
AEWA
CAF Action Plan
EUBD
Note:

Population size

Publication Start year End year Minimum Maximum Estimate quality Notes References Actions
WPE 1 1987 1991 5,000 5,000 [R519]
WPE 2 1987 1991 5,000 5,000 [R519]
WPE 3 1999 1999 25,000 100,000 [R68]
WPE 4 1995 1996 25,000 100,000 [S5503] [R181]
WPE 5 1995 1996 25,000 100,000 Best guess [R181] [R257]
CSR 4 1995 1996 25,000 100,000 Best guess [R181] [R257]
CSR 5 1995 1996 25,000 100,000 Best guess [R181] [R257]
CSR 6 1990 2004 25,000 50,000 Best guess [S8551] [R692] [R913] [R1442]

Population trends

Publication Start year End year Trend Trend quality Notes References Actions
WPE 1 1977 1991 DEC [R519]
WPE 2 1977 1991 DEC [R519]
WPE 3 1977 1991 DEC [R519]
WPE 4 1977 1991 DEC [R519]
WPE 5 1987 1991 DEC Reasonable [R519]
CSR 4 1987 1991 DEC Reasonable [R519]
CSR 5 1987 1991 DEC Reasonable [R519]
CSR 6 2003 2012 Unknown No idea [T6544]

Population 1% level

Publication Yearset 1 percent Note
WPE 1 1994 50
WPE 2 1997 50
WPE 3 2002 1000
WPE 4 2006 1000
WPE 5 2012 1000
CSR 4 0 -1
CSR 5 0 -1
CSR 6 0 -1

References

  • R519 - Perennou, C.P., Mundkur, T. and Scott, D.A. 1994. The Asian Waterfowl Census 1987-1991: distribution and status of Asian waterfowl. IWRB Spec. Publ. No. 24; AWB Spec. Publ. No. 86. Slimbridge, UK and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
  • R68 - BirdLife International. (2000). Threatened Birds of the World. Barcelona and Cambridge, UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife international
  • R181 - Delany, S.N., Reyes, C. Hubert, E., Pihl, S., Rees, E., Haanstra, L., and van Strien, A. 1999. Results from the International Waterbird Census in the Western Palearctic and Southwest Asia 1995 and 1996.
  • R257 - Gilissen, N., Haanstra, L. and Delany, S. Boere, G. and Hagemeijer, W. 2002. Numbers and Distribution of Wintering Waterbirds in the Western Palearctic and Southwest Asia in 1997, 1998 and 1999 - Results from the International Waterbird Census. Wetlands International Globale Series No. 11, Wageningen, The Netherlands
  • R692 - Wetlands International, International Waterbird Census, unpublished data, 2005. See: http://www.wetlands.org/listmenu.aspx?id=56f39008-f9a9-4569-92c1-a0457e95eeaf
  • R913 - Solokha, A. 2006. Results from the international waterbird census in Central Asia and the Caucasus 2003-2005. Wetlands International Russia, Moscow
  • R1442 - Petkov, N., Hughes, B., & Gallo-Orsi, U. 2003. Ferruginous Duck From Research to Conservation. In International Meeting Proceedings, Conservation Series (No. 6).
  • R1569 - Sheldon, R. 2017. Estimates of breeding waterbird populations in Central/SW Asia, The Caucasus and the Arabian Peninsula.
  • R1548 - Wetlands International (2017) Flyway trend analyses based on data from the African-Eurasian Waterbird Census from the period of 1967-2015. Ede, The Netherlands: Wetlands International. Temporary URL: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/r76f4eyuhzu65co/AADzzQkhySsUDsmwFJUcHs91a?dl=0
  • R1559 - BirdLife International (2017) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 30/09/2017.

Notes

  • S5503 - Counts in 1990s in Azerbaijan (9,000), Turkmenistan (20,833) & Uzbekistan (7,000) (65) suggest an estimate of 25,000-100,000 (183, 260).
  • S8551 - The maximum annual count total from SW Asia was 9,924 in 2004. Solokha (2006) also reported a total of 10,685 birds from Central Asia and the Caucasus. In E Africa, the maximum IWC count was 3,300 individuals in Sudan (Wetlands International, 2014). However, the total of the national maximum estimates in Petkov et al. (2002) is well below 50,000 individuals. Therefore, the upper limit is revised to 50,000.
  • T6544 - IWC count data is too sporadic to judge overall trend and highly influenced by effort. BirdLife International (2014) states. 'Evidence of declines in the larger Asian populations is sparse, and sometimes contradictory.'
  • S8922 - See CSR6 and Sheldon (2017).
  • T7161 - Wetlands International (2017) reported uncertain trend. BirdLife International (2017) has also noted: "Evidence of declines in the larger Asian populations is sparse, and sometimes contradictory".



Copyright Wetlands International 2012

Citation: Wetlands International (). "Waterbird Population Estimates" . Retrieved from wpe.wetlands.org on