Population information

Order name Anseriformes
Family name Anatidae
Scientific name Mareca penelope Common name Eurasian Wigeon
Population name Western Siberia/SW Asia & NE Africa
Breeding range Central & W Siberia Non-breeding range SW & Central Asia, NE Africa
Red List Category Least Concern
Ramsar regions Africa Asia Europe
Notes

Conservation Framework

Conservation framework Notes
AEWA
CAF Action Plan
EUBD
Note:

Population size

Publication Start year End year Minimum Maximum Estimate quality Notes References Actions
WPE 1 1987 1991 250,000 250,000 [R519]
WPE 2 1987 1991 250,000 250,000 [R519]
WPE 3 1987 1991 250,000 250,000 [R519]
WPE 4 1987 1991 250,000 250,000 [R519]
WPE 5 1987 1991 250,000 250,000 Expert opinion [R519]
CSR 5 1987 1991 250,000 250,000 Expert opinion [R519]
CSR 4 1987 1991 250,000 250,000 Expert opinion [R519]
CSR 6 2003 2012 180,000 200,000 Expert opinion [S8528] [R1365] [R578] [R519] [R913] [R1371] [R1497]

Population trends

Publication Start year End year Trend Trend quality Notes References Actions
WPE 1 1977 1991 DEC [R519]
WPE 2 1977 1991 DEC [R519]
WPE 3 1977 1991 DEC [R519]
WPE 4 1977 1991 DEC [R519]
WPE 5 1997 2007 DEC? No idea [T5981] [R888]
CSR 5 1997 2007 DEC? Reasonable [T3336] [R888]
CSR 4 1987 1991 DEC Reasonable
CSR 6 2003 2012 DEC Poor [T6524] [R1336] [R1381] [R1365]

Population 1% level

Publication Yearset 1 percent Note
WPE 1 1994 2500
WPE 2 1997 2500
WPE 3 2002 2500
WPE 4 2006 2500
WPE 5 2012 2500
CSR 5 0 -1
CSR 4 0 -1
CSR 6 0 -1

References

  • R519 - Perennou, C.P., Mundkur, T. and Scott, D.A. 1994. The Asian Waterfowl Census 1987-1991: distribution and status of Asian waterfowl. IWRB Spec. Publ. No. 24; AWB Spec. Publ. No. 86. Slimbridge, UK and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
  • R888 - Wetlands International, 2012. Results of trend analysis undertaken for CSR5 2012, presented in Annex 4. http://www.unep-aewa.org/meetings/en/mop/mop5_docs/pdf/mop5_14_csr5.pdf
  • R1365 - Wetlands International, International Waterbird Census, unpublished data, 2014.
  • R578 - Scott, D.A. and Rose, P.M. 1996. Atlas of Anatidae populations in Africa and western Eurasia. Wetlands International Publication No. 41. Wetlands International, Wageningen, NL. 336 pp.
  • R913 - Solokha, A. 2006. Results from the international waterbird census in Central Asia and the Caucasus 2003-2005. Wetlands International Russia, Moscow
  • R1371 - Dodman, T. 2014. Status, Estimates and Trends of Waterbird Populations in Africa: AEWA-listed African populations. Wetlands International. (CSR6 African populations) URL: https://www.wetlands.org/publications/1304/
  • R1497 - Ash & Atkins 2009
  • R1336 - WI2014
  • R1381 - Nagy, S., Flink, S., Langendoen, T. (2014) Waterbird trends 1988-2012: Results of trend analyses of data from the International Waterbird Census in the African-Eurasian Flyway. Wetlands International, Ede.
  • R1548 - Wetlands International (2017) Flyway trend analyses based on data from the African-Eurasian Waterbird Census from the period of 1967-2015. Ede, The Netherlands: Wetlands International. Temporary URL: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/r76f4eyuhzu65co/AADzzQkhySsUDsmwFJUcHs91a?dl=0

Notes

  • T5981 - Wetlands International 2012. Trend 1983-2007: -5.2% p.a. ? Significant long-term decline. However, most data from only one country, Iran, providing unsafe basis for regional trend.
  • T3336 - 898. Trend 1983-2007: -5.2% p.a. – Significant long-term decline. However, most data from only one country, Iran, providing unsafe basis for regional trend.
  • S8528 - Perennou et al. (1994) estimates the size of this population to be 250,000 individual based on IWC counts ranging from 111,000 to 210,000, but this estimate relies heavily on data from the 1970s as Scott and Rose (1996) pointed out. The latter authors considered it unlikely that more than 200,000 individuals are in West Asia. However, extensive surveys in 2003 and 2004 around the Caspian Sea (Solokha, 2006) produced a total count of 138,302 and 126,702 individuals. Surveys in Arabia resulted never more than 1,500 birds in the period of 1990-1996. Scott and Rose (1996) assumed that some 5,000-20,000 birds winter in Sudan and 10,000-40,000 birds in Ethiopia (Wetlands International, 2014). The 8,500 birds counted in Sudan suggests that the former might be correct. However, in Ethiopia the maximum annual count is less than 1,800 individuals despite a fairly good coverage of key sites. However, Ash & Atkinson (2009) describes the species as very common in Ethiopia and mentions of concentrations of 2500-4000 individuals. Therefore, Dodman (2014) estimates that there could be still 20,000-35,000 individuals in NE Africa. Considering also its rapid decline, it is very unlikely that the population size currently exceeds 160,000-180,000 birds.
  • T6524 - Results of the IWC for this population highly depends on survey intensity and results of the trend analysis contain only a low proportion of real counts during the assessment period. This is mainly caused by sporadic access and counts in the Gizilagach Bay, a main wintering area in Azerbaijan that alone supports 44,800-51,800 individuals when counted properly. However, a clear declining trend can be detected at all but one of the 18 sites in Iran that holds the largest numbers in the country.
  • T6918 - Significant long-term decline.



Copyright Wetlands International 2012

Citation: Wetlands International (). "Waterbird Population Estimates" . Retrieved from wpe.wetlands.org on