Population information

Order name Phoecopteriformes
Family name Phoenicopteridae
Scientific name Phoenicopterus roseus Common name Greater Flamingo
Population name West Africa
Breeding range Mauritania Non-breeding range Mauritania, Senegal, Guinea- Bissau, Guinea, Niger
Red List Category Least Concern
Ramsar regions Africa
Notes Recognised as a separate species from ruber following BirdLife. (WPE4)

Conservation Framework

Conservation framework Notes
AEWA
Note:

Population size

Publication Start year End year Minimum Maximum Estimate quality Notes References Actions
WPE 3 2002 2002 40,000 40,000 [R604]
WPE 4 0 0 45,000 95,000 [S4121] [R47]
WPE 1 0 0 40,000 40,000 [R150]
WPE 2 0 0 40,000 40,000 [R150]
WPE 5 2005 2005 45,000 95,000 Expert opinion [R47]
CSR 4 2005 2005 45,000 95,000 Expert opinion [R47]
CSR 5 2005 2005 45,000 95,000 Expert opinion [R47]
CSR 6 2005 2005 45,000 95,000 Expert opinion [R192]

Population trends

Publication Start year End year Trend Trend quality Notes References Actions
WPE 3 1991 2001 STA [R190]
WPE 4 1995 2005 INC [R47]
WPE 1 0 0 Unknown
WPE 2 0 0 Unknown
WPE 5 1995 2005 INC Poor [R47]
CSR 4 1995 2005 INC Poor [R47]
CSR 5 1995 2005 INC Poor [R47]
CSR 6 2001 2007 STA/FLU Reasonable [T6653] [R1402] [R1359] [R1371]

Population 1% level

Publication Yearset 1 percent Note
WPE 3 2002 400
WPE 4 2006 700
WPE 1 1994 400
WPE 2 1997 400
WPE 5 2012 650
CSR 4 0 -1
CSR 5 0 -1

References

  • R604 - Specialist]] Unpublished information supplied by Wetlands International Specialist Groups, 2002.
  • R190 - Dodman, T. 2002. Waterbird Population Estimates in Africa. Unpublished report to Wetlands International.
  • R47 - B?chet, A. 2005. Estimate of the Greater Flamingo Phoenicopterus roseus population size in the Western Palearctic in 2005. In: Childress, B., B?chet, A., Arengo, F. and Jarrett, N. (eds.) 2005. Flamingo, Bulletin of the IUCN-SSC/Wetlands International Flamingo Specialist Group
  • R150 - Cramp, S. and Simmons, K.E.L. (eds.). 1977. Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. Vol.1: Ostrich to Ducks. Oxford University Press. Oxford, London and New York.
  • R192 - Dodman, T., 2006. Status, estimates and trends of waterbird populations in Africa. Wetlands International, Dakar.
  • R1402 - Isenmann et al. (2010)
  • R1359 - van Roomen, M., van Winden, E. & Langendoen, T. 2014. The assessment of trends and population sizes of a selection of waterbird species and populations from the coastal East Atlantic Flyway for Conservation Status Report 6 of The African Eurasian Waterbird Agreement. Wadden Sea Flyway Initiative, Wetlands International & Birdlife International.
  • R1371 - Dodman, T. 2014. Status, Estimates and Trends of Waterbird Populations in Africa: AEWA-listed African populations. Wetlands International. (CSR6 African populations) URL: https://www.wetlands.org/publications/1304/
  • R1552 - van Roomen M., Nagy S., Foppen R., Dodman T., Citegetse G. & Ndiaye A. 2015. Status of coastal waterbird populations in the East Atlantic Flyway. With special attention to flyway populations making use of the Wadden Sea. Programme Rich Wadden Sea, Leeuwarden, The Netherlands, Sovon, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, Wetlands International, Wageningen, The Netherlands, BirdLife International, Cambridge, United Kingdom &, Common Wadden Sea Secretariat, Wilhelmshaven, Germany. URL: http://www.waddensea-secretariat.org/sites/default/files/downloads/status_coastal_birds_eaf_2014_1.pdf
  • R1548 - Wetlands International (2017) Flyway trend analyses based on data from the African-Eurasian Waterbird Census from the period of 1967-2015. Ede, The Netherlands: Wetlands International. Temporary URL: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/r76f4eyuhzu65co/AADzzQkhySsUDsmwFJUcHs91a?dl=0

Notes

  • S4121 - 48: Up to 15,000 pairs (45,000 individuals) bred in Mauritania in 2005. Total January counts of up to 97,000 in West Africa (189) include birds from other populations.
  • T6653 - Breeding numbers vary between years, but general increase noted: pairs at PNBA 9000 in 2001, 13,000-16600 in 2005, 11,500 in 2007; clear indications of mixing of this population with birds of Spanish origin.
  • T6860 - Although the IWC trend analysis shows a steep decline since 1980 (Wetlands International 2017) this should be treated with caution because it may just reflect chance events in the dsitribution of birds. van Roomen et al. (2015) also highlighted large fluctuations in January IWC counts, but the trend from 2001 agrees well with the increase in breding numbers reported by Dodman (2014).



Copyright Wetlands International 2012

Citation: Wetlands International (). "Waterbird Population Estimates" . Retrieved from wpe.wetlands.org on