Population information

Order name Charadriiformes
Family name Laridae
Scientific name Sternula balaenarum Common name Damara Tern
Population name Namibia & South Africa/Atlantic coast to Ghana
Breeding range Namibia to Cape Province South Africa Non-breeding range SW South Africa to Nigeria, W to Liberia
Red List Category Least Concern
Ramsar regions Africa
Notes

Conservation Framework

Conservation framework Notes
AEWA
Note:

Population size

Publication Start year End year Minimum Maximum Estimate quality Notes References Actions
WPE 3 0 0 14,000 14,000 No quality assessment [R593]
WPE 4 0 0 14,000 14,000 No quality assessment [R593]
WPE 1 0 0 13,000 13,000 No quality assessment [R591]
WPE 2 0 0 14,450 14,450 No quality assessment [R591]
WPE 5 1997 2001 14,000 14,000 Expert opinion [R196] [R593]
AEWA CSR 4 1997 2001 14,000 14,000 Expert opinion [R196] [R593]
AEWA CSR 5 1997 2001 14,000 14,000 Expert opinion [R196] [R593]
AEWA CSR 6 2012 2014 3,000 7,250 Expert opinion [S8694] [R1391]
AEWA CSR 7 2012 2016 3,000 7,250 Expert opinion [R1391]
AEWA CSR 8 2010 2011 3,400 8,500 Expert opinion [R1755]

Population trends

Publication Start year End year Trend Trend quality Notes References Actions
WPE 3 1991 2001 STA No quality assessment [R190]
WPE 4 1991 2001 STA No quality assessment [R190]
WPE 1 0 0 Unknown No quality assessment
WPE 2 0 0 Unknown No quality assessment
WPE 5 1991 2001 STA Poor [R190]
AEWA CSR 4 1991 2001 STA Poor [R190]
AEWA CSR 5 1991 2001 STA Poor [R190]
AEWA CSR 6 2003 2014 DEC? Reasonable [T6697] [R1391] [R1359] [R1490]
AEWA CSR 7 2003 2014 DEC? Reasonable [T7230] [R1391] [R1552]
AEWA CSR 8 2007 2017 STA Reasonable [T7641] [R1726] [R1620] [R1552] [R1619]

Population 1% level

Publication Yearset 1 percent Note
WPE 3 2002 140
WPE 4 2002 140
WPE 1 1994 130
WPE 2 1997 145
WPE 5 2002 140
AEWA CSR 4 -1 -1 Not Set
AEWA CSR 5 -1 -1 Not Set
AEWA CSR 7 2018 50
AEWA CSR 8 2018 50

References

  • R593 - Simmons, R.E., Cordes, I. and Braby, R. 1998. Latitudinal trends, population size and habitat preferences of the Damara Tern Sterna balaenarum on Namibia's desert coast. Ibis 140: 439-445.
  • R190 - Dodman, T. 2002. Waterbird Population Estimates in Africa. Unpublished report to Wetlands International.
  • R591 - Simmons, R. (in press). Distribution and density trends of Damara Terns along Namibia's desert coast. In. Underhill, L.G., Cooper, J. and Simmons, R.E. (eds.). (in press). Southern Birds. Univ. of Cape Town.
  • R196 - du Toit, M., Boere, G.C., Cooper, J., Kemper, J., Lenten, B., Simmons, R.S., Whittington, P.A. and Byers, O. (eds). 2002. Conservation assessment and management plan for southern African coastal seabirds. Workshop Report, Cape Town, South Africa, 4-8 Feb
  • R1391 - Wanless, R. et al. (in prep.) Action Plan for the Benguela Current seabirds. AEWA Secretariat, Bonn.
  • R1359 - van Roomen, M., van Winden, E. & Langendoen, T. 2014. The assessment of trends and population sizes of a selection of waterbird species and populations from the coastal East Atlantic Flyway for Conservation Status Report 6 of The African Eurasian Waterbird Agreement. Wadden Sea Flyway Initiative, Wetlands International & Birdlife International.
  • R1490 - Angel, A., Wanless, R. & Hagen, C. 2014. Fact sheets for AEWA-listed seabird species in the Benguela region. Prepared for the African-Eurasian Waterbird Agreement by BirdLife South Africa. Manuscript.
  • R1552 - van Roomen M., Nagy S., Foppen R., Dodman T., Citegetse G. & Ndiaye A. 2015. Status of coastal waterbird populations in the East Atlantic Flyway. With special attention to flyway populations making use of the Wadden Sea. Programme Rich Wadden Sea, Leeuwarden, The Netherlands, Sovon, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, Wetlands International, Wageningen, The Netherlands, BirdLife International, Cambridge, United Kingdom &, Common Wadden Sea Secretariat, Wilhelmshaven, Germany. URL: http://www.waddensea-secretariat.org/sites/default/files/downloads/status_coastal_birds_eaf_2014_1.pdf
  • R1755 - Hagen, C. & Wanless, R. 2015. International Multi-species Action Plan for the Conservation of Benguela Upwelling System Coastal Seabirds. AEWA Technical Series No. 60. Bonn, Germany.
  • R1726 - Hagen, C. & Wanless, R. 2015. International Multi-species Action Plan for the Conservation of Benguela Upwelling System Coastal Seabirds. AEWA Technical Series No. 60. Bonn, Germany
  • R1620 - van Roomen, M., Nagy, S., Citegetse, G., & Schekkerman, H. (2018). East Atlantic Flyway Assessment 2017: the status of coastal waterbird populations and their sites. Wadden Sea Flyway Initiative p/a CWSS, Wetlands International, BirdLife International, Wilhelmshaven, Wageningen and Cambridge. Retrieved from: https://www.waddensea-worldheritage.org/resources/east-atlantic-flyway-assessment-2017
  • R1619 - Nagy, S. & Langendoen, T. (2020) Flyway trend analyses based on data from the African-Eurasian Waterbird Census from the period of 1967-2018. Online publication. Wetlands International, Wageningen, The Netherlands. URL: http://iwc.test.wetlands.org/index.php/aewatrends8

Notes

  • S8694 - 50 pairs in ZA, 930-2,350 pairs in NA, 10 pairs in Angola (Wanless et al, in prep.).
  • T6697 - Number of colonies decreased due to recreational pressures and construction at its breeding grounds (Wanless et al., in prep.). Based on mid-winter counts, stable/fluctuating trend both in the long- and in the short-term (1992-2014 and 2003-2014, respectively) according to van Roomen et al. (2014). The species is possibly in significant long-term decline (Angel et al., 2014).
  • T7230 - Number of colonies decreased due to recreational pressures and construction at its breeding grounds (Wanless et al., in prep.). van Roomen et al. (2015) also confirms the decline both for the short- and the long-term based on IWC counts. The species is possibly in significant long-term decline (Angel et al., 2014).
  • T7641 - Wanless and Hagen (2015) reported unknown trend for the population but stable trend for the population in NA, where majority of the birds breed, decline in ZA and unknown trend in AO based on trends in colony numbers. Simmons et al. (2015) also noted that there is little evidence of population declines apart from the extinction of three colonies. Based on IWC data, van Roomen et al. (2018) reported also stable trends for 1992-2017 (1.01) and 2008-2017 (1.00). This is a rather different result from van Roomen et al. (2015) which indicated a decline. Based on IWC data from only NA and ZA, Nagy & Langendoen (2020) reported moderate decrease for 1995-2016 (0.9194) and uncertain trend for 2007-2016 (0.8384) and showing a fluctuating population. The different results are caused by methodological differences such as site selection and running the trend analysis at regional or at country level. However, count totals have substantially decreased in NA after 2008 and also in ZA. The observed fluctuations are believed to be related to observability of these birds during the breeding season rather than to genuine population changes.



Copyright Wetlands International 2012

Citation: Wetlands International (). "Waterbird Population Estimates" . Retrieved from wpe.wetlands.org on