Population information

Order name Charadriiformes
Family name Laridae
Scientific name Larus hemprichii Common name Sooty Gull
Population name Red Sea, Gulf, Arabia & Eastern Africa
Breeding range Red Sea, Gulfs of Persia, Oman, Aden, E to Pakistan, S to Kenya Non-breeding range
Red List Category Least Concern
Ramsar regions Africa Asia
Notes

Conservation Framework

Conservation framework Notes
AEWA
CAF Action Plan
Note:

Population size

Publication Start year End year Minimum Maximum Estimate quality Notes References Actions
WPE 2 1987 1991 40,000 40,000 No quality assessment [R519]
WPE 4 0 0 150,000 300,000 No quality assessment [R178]
WPE 1 1987 1991 40,000 40,000 No quality assessment [R519]
WPE 3 0 0 150,000 300,000 No quality assessment [R178]
WPE 5 1995 1995 150,000 300,000 Expert opinion [R178]
AEWA CSR 4 1995 1995 150,000 300,000 Expert opinion [R178]
AEWA CSR 5 1995 1995 150,000 300,000 Expert opinion [R178]
AEWA CSR 6 1990 2010 88,000 95,000 Census based [S8404] [R1360] [R1405] [R1411] [R178] [R1371]
AEWA CSR 7 1990 2010 88,000 95,000 Census based [S8404] [R1360] [R1405] [R1411] [R178] [R1371]
AEWA CSR 8 1990 2010 88,000 95,000 Expert opinion [S9573]

Population trends

Publication Start year End year Trend Trend quality Notes References Actions
WPE 2 0 0 Unknown No quality assessment
WPE 4 1989 1999 INC? No quality assessment [T1402] [R521]
WPE 1 0 0 Unknown No quality assessment
WPE 3 0 0 Unknown No quality assessment
WPE 5 1989 1999 INC? No idea [R521]
AEWA CSR 4 1989 1999 INC? No idea [R521]
AEWA CSR 5 1989 1999 INC? No idea [R521]
AEWA CSR 6 1980 2011 INC? Poor [T6403] [R1405] [R1415]
AEWA CSR 7 1980 2011 INC? Poor [T6403] [R1405] [R1415]
AEWA CSR 8 2008 2017 INC? Reasonable [T7619] [R1405] [R1748] [R428] [R1619] [R1571]

Population 1% level

Publication Yearset 1 percent Note
WPE 2 1994 400
WPE 4 2002 2300
WPE 1 1994 400
WPE 3 2002 2300
WPE 5 2012 2100
AEWA CSR 4 -1 -1 Not Set
AEWA CSR 5 -1 -1 Not Set
AEWA CSR 6 -1 -1 Not Set
AEWA CSR 7 2018 910
AEWA CSR 8 2018 910

References

  • R519 - Perennou, C.P., Mundkur, T. and Scott, D.A. 1994. The Asian Waterfowl Census 1987-1991: distribution and status of Asian waterfowl. IWRB Spec. Publ. No. 24; AWB Spec. Publ. No. 86. Slimbridge, UK and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
  • R178 - del Hoyo, J., Elliot, A. and Sargatal, J. (eds). 1996. Handbook of the Birds of the World. Volume 3: Hoatzin to Auks. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
  • R521 - PERSGA/GEF. 2003. Status of Breeding Seabirds in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. PERSGA Technical Series No. 8. PERSGA, Jeddah.
  • R1360 - Jennings, M. C., & Krupp, F. (2010). Fauna of Arabia, Vol. 25. Atlas of the breeding birds of Arabia: King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology.
  • R1405 - Shobrak, M., Alsuhaybany, A. & Al-Sagheir, O. (compliers) 2003. Regional Status of Breeding Seabirds in the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. The Regional Organization for the Conservation of the Environment of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden (PERSGA), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. URL: http://www.persga.org/Files/Common/Sea_Birds/Reginal_Status_of_Seabirds.pdf
  • R1411 - Semere et al. 2003
  • R1371 - Dodman, T. 2014. Status, Estimates and Trends of Waterbird Populations in Africa: AEWA-listed African populations. Wetlands International. (CSR6 African populations) URL: https://www.wetlands.org/publications/1304/
  • R1415 - Shobrak (2013)
  • R1748 - Shobrak, M. Y., & Aloufi, A. A. (2014). Status of breeding seabirds on the Northern Islands of the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. Saudi journal of biological sciences, 21(3), 238-249.
  • R428 - Malling Olsen, K. and Larsson, H. 2002. Gulls of Europe, Asia and North America. Helm and Princeton University Press.
  • R1619 - Nagy, S. & Langendoen, T. (2020) Flyway trend analyses based on data from the African-Eurasian Waterbird Census from the period of 1967-2018. Online publication. Wetlands International, Wageningen, The Netherlands. URL: http://iwc.test.wetlands.org/index.php/aewatrends8
  • R1571 - de Fouw, J., A.W. Thorpe, R.A. Bom, S. de Bie, C.J. Camphuysen, B. Etheridge, W. Hagemeijer, L. Hofstee, T. Jager, L. Kelder, R. Kleefstra, M. Kersten, S. Nagy & R.H.G. Klaassen. 2017. Barr Al Hikman, a major shorebird hotspot within the Asian–East African yway: results of three winter surveys. Wader Study 124(1): 10–25.

Notes

  • T1402 - PERSGA/GEF (2003): It may be increasing in northern Egyptian Red Sea islands.
  • S8404 - Jennings (2010) estimates numbers only at 28,000 pairs in Arabia. Shobrak (2003) accounts for further 150-200 pairs from EG and SO, but Dodman (2014) reports at least 165 pairs from EG alone. Del Hoyo (1996) mentions 50-100 pairs in KE. Semere et al. (2008) reports 1,067 pairs from ER. This yields an estimate of 29,267-29,367 pairs, which is much less than the 50,000-100,000 pairs estimate of Del Hoyo et al. (1996). The upper limit of the estimate accounts for some unknown numbers from IR, PK and SO.
  • T6403 - Shobrak (2003, 2013).
  • S9573 - Jennings (2010) estimates numbers only at 28,000 pairs in Arabia. Shobrak (2003) accounts for further 150-200 pairs from EG and SO, but Dodman (2014) reports at least 165 pairs from EG alone. Del Hoyo (1996) mentions 50-100 pairs in KE. Semere et al. (2008) reports 1,067 pairs from ER. This yields an estimate of 29,267-29,367 pairs, which is much less than the 50,000-100,000 pairs estimate of Del Hoyo et al. (1996). The upper limit of the estimate accounts for some unknown numbers from IR, PK and SO.
  • T7619 - The trend of the breeding population is assessed as increasing based on Shobrak et al. (2003, 2013) from the Red Sea and the Bay of Aden. Number of breeding birds is reduced along the E African coast (Olsen and Larsson, 2003). Based on IWC data from AE, IR, PK and predominantly from OM, i.e. from the northern part of the range, Nagy & Langendoen (2020) reported uncertain trends with negative tendency for 1989-2017 (0.9418), 1993-2017 (0.9266) with some rebound during the period of 2008-2017 (1.1908). This decline and subsequent recovery is also consistent with the observations of de Fouw et a. (2017) from Barr al Hikman, OM. However, the biologically implausible rate of increase in the short-term suggests that the monitoring is still inadequate in the region and the increase might be linked to improved counting efforts in recent years. Considering that the decline is based on a long time series of data, that is adopted as the long-term trend. Based on the smoothed imputed totals, the population has decreased by 60% (n.s.) in 24 years, i.e. in 3 generations. However, it is assumed that the population is increasing in the short-term.



Copyright Wetlands International 2012

Citation: Wetlands International (). "Waterbird Population Estimates" . Retrieved from wpe.wetlands.org on